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    Bone-In Standing Ribeye Roast Recipe

    Published December 15, 2021. This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy.

    This bone-in-standing ribeye roast that is coated in garlic and herbs is the perfect meal to serve up to your friends and family. These foolproof instructions will ensure your prime rib is impeccable.

    Just like when you’re making a smoked turkey or braising short ribs, I know how time-consuming and expensive these recipes can be. Rest assured that I’ve made this quite a few times and it is always superb, so no need to be intimated.

    4 bone-in prime rib roast with potatoes

    Be sure to check out my video tutorial below for step-by-step instructions to ensure there are no questions when making this.

    Bone-In Standing Ribeye Roast Recipe Video

    If you loved this Ribeye Roast video, then please subscribe to my YouTube channel for more great recipes. Be sure to smash the bell icon so you’ll k/now as soon as I post a new video.

    What to Know When Buying a Ribeye Roast

    When selecting your bone-in ribeye roast, you should figure about 2 pounds per 1 bone. While you’ll lose about 4 to 6 ounces because of the bone, you’ll still be left with at least 24 ounces of beef left which should easily feed at least 2 people.

    A 4-bone ribeye roast should feed about 8 people just so you can get your calculations correct in case you were thinking it’s a bone per person. You can also ask your butcher for a recommendation on size.

    In addition, there are several different grades of meat, including prime, choice, grass-fed, amongst several others.

    My personal thought is that these are expensive and you’re loading it up with herbs, garlic, salt and pepper, and slow cooking it, so no need to drop the bank on the most expensive cut of beef.

    A prime grade will cost around $17 to $20 per pound. You can absolutely purchase whatever cut of beef you’d like, but I just think for the normal everyday palette that it’s probably not worth it to go all-in on a Wagyu or Kobe prime rib roast.

    Is It the Same Thing as a Prime Rib?

    Prime rib and a ribeye roast can be the same thing if the grading lines up. The word “prime” is the legal grade that has been given by the USDA, so if your ribeye roast is of a prime grade, then you’ve got yourself a “prime rib roast.”

    Standing Rib Roast Ingredients

    ingredients for a prime rib
    • Ribeye – It is best to use a bone-in roast.
    • Fat– Always unsalted butter to that you can control the salt content. You can also use olive oil, or a combo of both.
    • Thyme – Use fresh thyme in this recipe.
    • Rosemary – I like to use fresh rosemary.
    • Garlic – Whole peeled garlic cloves in this recipe.
    • Shallots – Peeled and roughly chopped.
    • Salt and Pepper – This is what will make your ribeye roast the most flavorful.

    How to Make a Bone-In Standing Ribeye Roast

    French and truss the ribeye roast and place it in a roasting pan, season it well with salt and pepper.

    trussing a bone-in prime rib

    Add the thyme, rosemary, garlic, shallots, olive oil, butter, salt, and pepper to a food processor and process at high speed until it comes together like a paste, compound butter mixed with chimichurri.

    making a compound butter in a food processor

    Spread the herb butter all over the top of the ribeye cap and then generously season with salt and pepper.

    spreading an herb butter on a ribeye roast

    Hit it in the oven and cook in at 450° for 30 minutes. Then turn the heat down to 325° and cook for about 80-90 minutes or until it is 110°-115° internally.  When cooking this ribeye roast recipe in the oven you want to first get a nice brown on the outside by cooking it at high temps before turning the heat down and letting it slow cook.

    cooking a bone in ribeye roast in the oven

    With about 45-50 minutes before the ribeye is done cooking, optionally add the olive oil coated and season potatoes around the pan with the rib roast and cook alongside the roast.

    baby potatoes in a roast pan with a prime rib

    You want to remove the ribeye from the pan along with the potatoes, set them aside to rest for 10 to 15 minutes.

    resting a prime rib

    ­Serve alongside some creamy horseradish sauce.

    serving a prime ribeye roast with horseradish sauce

    What Temperature Should It Be Done At

    Oven temperatures can vary when it comes to the cooking procedure of a ribeye.  I personally like to caramelize the outside crust at a high temperature and then turn it down and finish the rest of the way. These times and temperatures will render a rare to medium-rare internal temperature.

    • 475° for 25 minutes and then 325° for 12 to 14 minutes per pound
    • 450° for 30 minutes and then 325° for 12 to 14 minutes per pound

    However, you can cook it at one temperature all the way through:

    • 325° at 17 to 20 minutes per pound
    • 350° at 15-17 minutes per pound
    • 375° at 13-15 minutes per pound

    The best option is to just cook it at your desired temperature until it reaches 110°-115° right in the center. Pull it out, let it rest for 15-20 minutes, which will increase the temperature by another 10° and sometimes 15° bringing it to that perfect medium-rare to medium internal temperature.

    Do You Cook It Covered or Uncovered?

    In my professional opinion, it should always be uncovered so that the outside of the roast can form a caramelized crust further enhancing the flavor.  With that being said, you can cover it with foil after you’ve done your initial 30 minutes roast at 450° uncovered.

    Can You Cut Steaks from a Ribeye Roast?

    You can cut raw or cooked steaks from it.  If you slice it raw you will get a bone-in ribeye, and if you slice it after it’s cooked, you will get prime rib.

    Make-Ahead and Storage

    Make-Ahead: This recipe is meant to be eaten as soon as it is done resting. 

    How to Store: Store it in a plastic container or covered in plastic and refrigerate for up to 4 days.  It can also be frozen for up to 45 days covered in plastic.  See note above for reheating.

    How to Reheat: While I never recommend reheating a hunk of beef I do realize you may not be able to eat it all.  Slice the roast into desired portions and add it to a large sauté or roasting pan or with about 1 cup of beef stock, covered in foil and cooked in the oven at 400° for 10 to 12 minutes.  Reheating your steak will 100% cause it to increase in internal temperature most likely past medium and into medium-well.

    Chef Billy Parisi

    chef notes + tips

    • These times and temperatures above will render a medium-rare to medium internal temperature.
    • I highly recommend investing in a good real-time read thermometer.
    • Feel free to ask your butcher to “french” the bones to expose them if you do not want to do it.
    • The ribeye roast cap is the outer rim of the prime rib that helps to provide all the flavor.
    • Your butcher can truss the roast for you.
    • The roast does not need to be bone-in, but it does make it look beautiful and can add flavor.
    • If you notice the bones starting to brown too fast, cover them with foil.
    • When resting the roast once it’s done cooking you can cover it with foil, but it isn’t necessary.
    • I like to check the temperature of the meat after being in the oven at 325° for 60 minutes.
    • When the meat rests after cooking it will rise another 15-20°.
    slice prime rib roast on a platter

    More Beef Recipes

    Let's Cook - Chef Billy Parisi

    Video

    Bone-In Standing Ribeye Roast Recipe

    5 from 30 votes
    This bone-in-standing ribeye roast that is coated in garlic and herbs is the perfect meal to serve up to your friends and family.
    Servings: 12
    Prep Time: 30 minutes
    Cook Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
    Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes

    Ingredients 

    • 20 sprigs of fresh thyme
    • rosemary leaves from 3 sprigs
    • 12-14 garlic cloves
    • 1 peeled shallot
    • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • 2 sticks unsalted butter, cut up
    • 8-10 pound bone-in standing rib roast trussed and Frenched
    • 2 pounds of assorted colored baby potatoes
    • salt and pepper to taste
    • horseradish sauce

    Instructions

    • Preheat the oven to 450°.
    • Season the roast well on all sides with salt and pepper and place in a roasting pan.
    • Add the thyme, rosemary, garlic cloves, peeled shallot, 3 tablespoons of olive oil, butter, and salt and pepper to a food processor and pulse on high speed until combined and like a thick paste.
    • Add the herb paste to the rib roast cap side up and apply it to all sides of the roast.
    • Bake at 450° for 30 minutes and then turn the heat down to 325° and cook for 80-90 minutes for a rare to medium-rare internal temperature, or once it reaches a 110° – 115° internally using a thermometer. I like to check the temperature of it after 60 minutes to see where I’m at.
    • With about 45 minutes left in the cooking process add the potatoes to a bowl and toss with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt and pepper, and then add them to the pan with the rib roast and cook for 40-45 minutes.
    • Remove the rib roast and potatoes form the pan and let the roast rest in the pan for 10-15 minutes.
    • Slice and serve.

    Notes

    Make-Ahead: This recipe is meant to be eaten as soon as it is done resting. 
    How to Store: Store it in a plastic container or covered in plastic and refrigerate for up to 4 days.  It can also be frozen for up to 45 days covered in plastic.  See note above for reheating.
    How to Reheat: While I never recommend reheating a hunk of beef I do realize you may not be able to eat it all.  Slice the roast into desired portions and add it a large sauté or roasting pan or with about 1 cup of beef stock, covered in foil and cooked in the oven at 400° for 10 to 12 minutes.  Reheating your steak will 100% cause it to increase in internal temperature most likely past medium and into medium-well.
    These times and temperatures above will render a medium-rare to medium internal temperature.
    I highly recommend investing in a good real-time read thermometer.
    Feel free to ask your butcher to “french” the bones to expose them if you do not want to do it.
    The ribeye roast cap is the outer rim of the prime rib that helps to provide all the flavor.
    Your butcher can truss the roast for you.
    The roast does not need to be bone-in, but it does make it look beautiful and can add flavor.
    If you notice the bones starting to brown too fast, cover them with foil.
    When resting the roast once it’s done cooking you can cover it with foil, but it isn’t necessary.
    I like to check the temperature of the meat after being in the oven at 325° for 60 minutes.
    When the meat rests after cooking it will rise another 15-20°.

    Nutrition

    Serving: 8ozCalories: 1010kcalCarbohydrates: 15gProtein: 43gFat: 85gSaturated Fat: 34gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 38gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 183mgSodium: 140mgPotassium: 1016mgFiber: 2gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 85IUVitamin C: 19mgCalcium: 45mgIron: 5mg
    Course: dinner, Main
    Cuisine: American
    Author: Chef Billy Parisi